This Day in History

This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Dec 4, 2005 - 1:30:00 PM

deigratia.jpg
On
December 4, 1872 The Dei Gratia, a small British brig under Captain David Morehouse, spotted the Mary Celeste, an American vessel, sailing erratically but at full sail near the Azores Islands in the Atlantic Ocean.

On December 4, 1992, President George H. Bush ordered 28,000 U.S. troops to Somalia, a war-torn East African nation where rival warlords were preventing the distribution of humanitarian aid to thousands of starving Somalis.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Nov 27, 2005 - 2:35:00 PM
history_008.jpg
On November 27, 1954, after 44 months in prison, former government official Alger Hiss was released and declared once again that he is innocent of the charges that led to his incarceration.
On November 27, 1978, former Board of Supervisors member Dan White murdered Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk at City Hall in San Francisco, California.

This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Nov 20, 2005 - 1:18:00 PM

whales.jpg
On
November 20, 1820, The American whaler Essex, which hailed from Nantucket, Massachusetts, was attacked by an 80-ton sperm whale 2,000 miles from the western coast of South America.

On November 20, 1945, The Nuremberg trials began when twenty-four high-ranking Nazis go on trial in Nuremberg, Germany, for atrocities committed during World War II.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Nov 13, 2005 - 8:36:00 PM

georgewashington.jpg
On
November 13, 1789, George Washington, who had become the first President of the United States only 7 months earlier, returned to Washington after wrapping up his first presidential tour.

On November 13, 1982, after the end of a weeklong national salute to Americans who served in the Vietnam War, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington after a march to its site by thousands of veterans of the conflict.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Nov 6, 2005 - 2:47:00 PM

abrahamlincoln.jpg
On
November 6, 1860 Abraham Lincoln was elected the 16th president of the United States over a deeply divided Democratic Party, becoming the first Republican to win the presidency.

On November 6, 1921, The Sheik opened across theatres nationwide and launched the career of its star, Rudolph Valentino.

 

 



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Oct 30, 2005 - 1:10:00 PM
orsonwelles.jpg
On
October 30 ,1938, Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre Company caused a nationwide panic with his broadcast of "War of the Worlds", a realistic radio dramatization of a Martian invasion of Earth.

This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Oct 2, 2005 - 2:47:00 PM

charlesdarwin.jpg
On
Oct. 2, 1836, the British naturalist Charles Darwin returned to Falmouth, England, aboard the H.M.S. Beagle, ending a five-year surveying expedition of the southern Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

On October 2, 1950, “Peanuts” the comic strip created by Charles Schulz, which featured such characters as Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Linus, debuted in seven newspapers.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Sep 25, 2005 - 2:46:00 PM

congress.jpg
On
September 25, 1789, the first Congress of the United States approved 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. These amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, protected certain rights of all U.S. citizens.

On September 25, 1981, Sandra Day O’ Connor became the first female justice of the U.S. Supreme Court when she was sworn in by Chief Justice William Berger.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Sep 18, 2005 - 1:47:00 PM

peg_entwistle.jpg
On Sept. 18, 1932, aspiring young actress Peg Entwistle climbed to the top of the letter “H” which was part of the Hollywoodland sign that over looked the Hollywood Hills and jumped to her death.

On Sept. 18, 1970, guitarist Jimi Hendrix died from a drug overdose in London, England.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Sep 4, 2005 - 1:45:00 PM

history_008_001.jpg
On September 4, 1886, Geronimo, one of the most dangerous Apache warriors of his time, formally surrendered in Skeleton Canyon, Arizona.

On September 4, 1972, Mark Spitz, an American swimmer, won his seventh gold medal at the 1972 Munich Summer Olympic games in the 400 meter relay event.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Sep 4, 2005 - 1:45:00 PM

history_008_001.jpg
On September 4, 1886, Geronimo, one of the most dangerous Apache warriors of his time, formally surrendered in Skeleton Canyon, Arizona.

On September 4, 1972, Mark Spitz, an American swimmer, won his seventh gold medal at the 1972 Munich Summer Olympic games in the 400 meter relay event.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 28, 2005 - 1:30:00 PM

history_006.jpg
On
August 28, 1879, King Cetshwayo, the last great ruler of Zululand, was captured by the British after his defeat in the British-Zulu war.

On August 23, 1963, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. as part of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 28, 2005 - 1:30:00 PM

history_006.jpg
On
August 28, 1879, King Cetshwayo, the last great ruler of Zululand, was captured by the British after his defeat in the British-Zulu war.

On August 23, 1963, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. as part of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 21, 2005 - 1:27:00 PM

history_004.jpg
On August 21, 1911, Vincent Peruggia, a former employee of the Louvre, walked into the Louvre in Paris, France and headed straight for the Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, removed it from the wall, hid it under his clothes and walked out of the Louvre with it.

On August 21, 1959, Hawaii was admitted into the United States of America by becoming the 50th state.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 21, 2005 - 1:27:00 PM

history_004.jpg
On August 21, 1911, Vincent Peruggia, a former employee of the Louvre, walked into the Louvre in Paris, France and headed straight for the Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, removed it from the wall, hid it under his clothes and walked out of the Louvre with it.

On August 21, 1959, Hawaii was admitted into the United States of America by becoming the 50th state.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 14, 2005 - 12:55:00 PM
automobiles.jpg
On August 14, 1893, the world’s first automobile license plates were issued in Paris, France.

On August 14, 1945, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito made an official announcement to the Japanese people informing them of Japan’s unconditional surrender to the Allies.

 

 



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 14, 2005 - 12:55:00 PM
automobiles.jpg
On August 14, 1893, the world’s first automobile license plates were issued in Paris, France.

On August 14, 1945, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito made an official announcement to the Japanese people informing them of Japan’s unconditional surrender to the Allies.

 

 



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 7, 2005 - 1:36:00 PM
day-inhistory.jpg
On August 7, 1782, General George Washington, the commader in chief of the Continental Army, created the "Badge for Military Merit", a decoration made of a purple, heart shaped peice of silk, edged with a binding of silver and the word 'Merit' stitched across the face of silver.

On August 7, 1915, race car driver Dario Resta broke the 100 mph speed barrier driving a Peugeot.



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Aug 7, 2005 - 1:36:00 PM
day-inhistory.jpg
On August 7, 1782, General George Washington, the commader in chief of the Continental Army, created the "Badge for Military Merit", a decoration made of a purple, heart shaped peice of silk, edged with a binding of silver and the word 'Merit' stitched across the face of silver.

On August 7, 1915, race car driver Dario Resta broke the 100 mph speed barrier driving a Peugeot.



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Jul 31, 2005 - 11:38:00 AM
daniel-defoe.jpg
On July 31, 1703, writer Daniel Defoe was put in the pillory in Charing Cross for “seditious libel” for a pamphlet he wrote satirizing the Church.

On July 31, 1975, Jimmy Hoffa, President of the Teamsters Union, was reported missing in Detroit, Michigan.

 



This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Jul 31, 2005 - 11:38:00 AM
daniel-defoe.jpg
On July 31, 1703, writer Daniel Defoe was put in the pillory in Charing Cross for “seditious libel” for a pamphlet he wrote satirizing the Church.

On July 31, 1975, Jimmy Hoffa, President of the Teamsters Union, was reported missing in Detroit, Michigan.

 



  This Day in History

By Marion Kerr on Jul 24, 2005 - 1:12:00 PM
mary-queen-of-scots.jpg
On July 24, 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots, is forced to abdicate her throne while imprisoned at Lochleven Castle in Scotland.

On July 24, 1959, during the grand opening ceremony of the American National Exhibition in Moscow, Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev engaged in a heated debate about capitalism and communism in the middle of a model kitchen set up for the fair. The so-called "kitchen debate" became one of the most famous episodes of the Cold War.



<< prev next >>