St. John's Confidential File
Marty Kove Lives To Be On Camera
By Michael St. John
Sep 22, 2013 - 5:40:36 AM

Marty_Kove.jpg
Marty Kove
HELLO AMERICA!—If “survival of the fittest” means anything at all it definitely represents the life and times of actor, writer, stuntman Marty Kove. Having met him during the early 1970s, I quickly learned what a determined man he was to sustain himself in this business of films, television and entertainment in general.  Caching up with Marty is always interesting, fun and at times outrageous!

 

MSJ: What outrageous things have you been up to since we last talked a few years ago?

 

MK: Oh, I’ve been in South America doing some filming; there were a few trips to China, Russia and of course London, Italy and Paris. Let’s face it, the “world” is home to me, I wouldn’t be happy settling down in one place, I enjoy and love too many things, too many types of people all of it makes life worth living.

 

MSJ: So restricting yourself to Hollywood is suffocating to you in a way?

 

MK: You got that right. Hollywood is a perfect place to find where the camera is; it’s a town known for having a front and no back, its fun, beautiful and shallow. But don’t get me wrong, I love the place, but I have to get outside of these make believe walls to gravel in the dirt ever so often. It’s important for me to feel alive and really significant as a simple human being who still has a dream. I think that’s important, especially if you’re an artist of any kind. I know a lot of people who never take off their makeup, they are fearful of reconnecting to reality; it’s a kind of truth that is painful.

 

MSJ: I remember you have always enjoyed being a part of sitcom comedies. Do you still have that kind of preference when it comes to TV work?

 

MK: Unfortunately, most of the sitcoms on the tube are stupid, stuffed with unbelievable characters, spewing out sick bits of dialog that scrapes the bottom of the barrel of ignorance. And because actors want and need to work they subject themselves the trash and garbage which many of these newer and younger so-called producers introduce. We’re in a sad state of things artistically and creatively. Frankly, I miss the Jack Benny and Steve Allen type shows and oh yes, George Burns and Gracie Allen, these shows kept you smiling or laughing because you could easily identify with the characters or situation they presented each week.  There were so many others as well.

 

MSJ: What kind of character would you enjoy playing now on TV or even in films?

 

MK: I’d like to play the kind of character who is balanced with humor who also has a very serious side, too. After all, life is not all laughter; it has a dimension of tears which allows the necessary emotional color-balance needed.

 

MSJ: After all these years being a part of the business, what have you learned about yourself?

 

MK: I’ll tell you one thing that I learned from my years on “Cagney and Lacey” as well as co-starring in films such as “Rambo” and “Karate Kid” that it is important to take advantage of the moment when you’re in the spotlight because it ends very quickly. And the struggle “to be” continues. As an actor, it is important not to get too full of yourself and relax. It’s not that I was guilty of that but I observed so many others who found it very hard to face the truth of what they had achieved and when the lights were turned off and the cameras were not rolling, they sank to the bottom very quickly. And they wondered why they didn’t have a “special” parking spot anymore. I’ve learned to take everything like acting, writing, life and even sex slow and really enjoy the trip, otherwise the only effect you’re left with is a half lighted cigarette.



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